Guns, guns, guns! Or maybe not…

Won’t somebody please think of the statistics!

Read this.

I do feel the author has missed a trick by taking the overall US murder rate rather than rates for specific states. For instance, New Hampshire, which has incredibly liberal gun laws, has a murder rate of 1.1 per 100,000 head of population, compared to a murder rate of 1.6 per 100,000 in Belgium, which has very illiberal gun laws.

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Last call for the “Cost of Living Crisis” debate

Libertarian Home’s star-studded event is tomorrow night at the Institute of Education, London. There’ll be speakers from the IEA, ARI, the bloke who used to be leader of the Libertarian Party, and a couple of state socialists.

The last few tickets can be bought here. (There is a promo code knocking about, courtesy of that nest of vipers The Adam Smith Institute.)

Details are here.

The speaker list can be found here. There are write-ups of some at the Lib Home site.

(That “nest of vipers” thing isn’t a joke, by the way.)

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Ebola, Markets, and Borders

Here are a couple of pieces on ‘libertarians for ebola’.

Thomas Knapp at C4SS, on the paper-shuffling of bureaucrats and the incentives of entrepreneurs.

Robert Murphy at LibertyChat, making a very clever point about “open” vs “private” borders.

Jeffrey Tucker makes some excellent and thoroughly reasonable points, too. (eg, “When people are afraid, they have this irrational penchant for reaching out to government to save them. Never mind that the power might be abused or might not even be a necessary, much less suitable, power. Government is magic: if something is big, important, or crucial, people long for government to do it.”)

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A note on a scandal

A politician was recorded saying that where employers are unwilling to hire disabled people at the national minimum wage, perhaps the government should step in and make up the difference. This caused outrage.

State socialists called for the politician to be sacked for being so disgustingly prejudiced. What the government should be doing – instead of demonising people – is stepping in to make up the difference where employers are unwilling to hire the disabled at the national minimum wage.

Disabled rights groups and charities demanded an apology from the politician, and suggested he might consider offering his resignation. What the government should be doing – instead of demonising people – is stepping in to make up the difference where employers are unwilling to hire the disabled at the national minimum wage.

Members of influential “free market” think tanks appeared on TV and radio to offer qualified defenses of the politician, and lay out the “free market” approach to the problem: the government should step in to make up the difference where employers are unwilling to hire the disabled at the national minimum wage. This, too, caused outrage.

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